Incomplete Spinal Cord Injuries

Baltimore Attorney Assisting Victims with Pursuing Compensation

An injury to the spinal cord may cause serious physical damage. Spinal injuries may be complete or incomplete, and even incomplete spinal cord injuries are often life-altering. If you suffered an incomplete spinal cord injury that you believe was caused by someone else’s negligence, you may be able to take legal action against the at-fault party through a personal injury claim. At Arfaa Law Group, Baltimore spinal cord injury lawyer Julia Arfaa has accumulated substantial experience in these types of cases and will work hard to make sure that you are not forced to bear the burden of someone else’s mistake or carelessness.

Legal Claims Based on Incomplete Spinal Cord Injuries

Incomplete spinal cord injuries are those in which some of the nerve fibers are not affected, and there is some remaining sensation and limited function. Put another way, with an incomplete spinal cord injury, there is some movement and feeling below the site of the injury, although the area may still be inhibited in a significant way. For example, an injury to the back that decreases sensation below the waist but does not eliminate sensation entirely would be considered an incomplete spinal cord injury. A complete spinal cord injury, on the other hand, is indicated by a total lack of sensory and motor function below the area of the injury.

If your spinal cord injury was caused by the careless behavior of another person, you probably would be able to seek compensation for the damages that you suffered through a negligence claim. Negligence takes place when a person causes an injury or death by failing to use the level of care and caution that a reasonably prudent person would have used in the same situation. In order to prevail on a negligence claim, the plaintiff must establish that the defendant needed to use a certain degree of care, and the defendant failed to do this. A negligence claim also requires proof that the defendant’s inadequate care was a direct cause of the plaintiff’s spinal cord injury.

It is important to note that Maryland follows the doctrine of contributory negligence. This is different from the doctrine of comparative negligence, used in most states, in which fault is relatively apportioned between the plaintiff and the defendant. For instance, if the plaintiff is deemed to be 15 percent negligent, their total award would be reduced by that amount under a comparative negligence rule. However, under Maryland’s contributory negligence system, if the plaintiff is even one percent at fault, they will not be able to recover any damages at all. This rule is sometimes challenging to plaintiffs, which is why it is important that you ask a knowledgeable spinal cord injury attorney to review your case.

Spinal cord injuries are some of the most serious and debilitating injuries that a person can suffer. Their effects often last throughout a person’s life. However, victims of incomplete spinal cord injuries may recover both economic and non-economic damages under Maryland law. Examples of these damages include medical bills, rehabilitation costs, lost income, pain and suffering, disability, and other types of harm arising from the accident. The compensation may come through a settlement agreement or through a jury verdict after a trial.

Seek Guidance from an Injury Lawyer in the Baltimore Area

If you or a loved one has suffered an incomplete spinal cord injury due to the negligence of another party, we can help. Baltimore attorney Julia Arfaa can assess the facts of your case and determine the viability of your claim. We have aggressively pursued compensation on behalf of many accident victims and patients harmed by medical malpractice. We represent people throughout the State of Maryland. Time is of the essence in these cases, so it is important to act quickly. You can reach us at 410-889-1850 or contact us online if you are interested in a free appointment with an injury lawyer.